Faculty Directory

Daniel C. Feiler

Associate Professor of Business Administration

Email

daniel.feiler@tuck.dartmouth.edu

Phone

603-646-0567

Website

http://faculty.tuck.dartmouth.edu/daniel-feiler/

Degree

PhD, Duke University, 2012; BS, Carnegie Mellon University, 2007

Areas of Expertise

The psychology of judgment and decision making by managers and within organizations

Courses

Managing People
Negotiations

Bio

Daniel C. Feiler is an associate professor at the Tuck School of Business in the Strategy & Management group. He is a behavioral scientist and his research explores the psychology of judgment and decision making and the role it plays in organizational behavior and management science. He has won paper and presentation awards at the Academy of Management conference, Behavioral Decision Research in Management conference, and Max Planck Institute for Human Development summer conference. His work has received popular press coverage in The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, New York MagazineMic, and Fast Company, among others. Drawing on his expertise in behavioral science, he teaches a popular MBA elective course, Negotiations. He was selected by the Tuck MBA Class of 2015 for the Excellence in Teaching Award, representing the first time a junior faculty member was selected for that award at Tuck. In 2017, he was selected as one of the Top 40 Business School Professors Under 40 years old by Poets and Quants. His work has been published in Management Science and Psychological Science, as well as in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology and Production and Operations Management. He is originally from Pittsburgh, PA and received his doctoral degree from Duke University.

Current Research Topics

  • Biases in social networks
  • Managerial overconfidence
  • Learning employee capability
  • Disclosure of conflicts of interest


Professional Activities

Academic positions

  • Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth, Associate Professor of Business Administration, Strategy & Management area, 2018–present
  • Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Strategy & Management area, 2014–18
  • Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth, Visiting Assistant Professor, 2012–14

Editorial positions

  • Reviewer: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Management Science, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Organization Science, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Strategic Management Journal


Awards

  • Top 40 Business School Professors Under 40 years old, Poets & Quants, 2017
  • Teaching Excellence Award (elective), selected by Tuck graduating class of 2015
  • Best Paper Award, Conflict Management Division, AOM Conference, 2013

Working Papers

  • With J. Tong, "From Noise to Bias in Linked Supply Chain Decisions"
  • With J. Tong, "Capability Censorship: How Work Assignments Shape Managerial Perceptions of Employee Potential"

Selected Publications

  • With R. Adner, "Innovation Interdependence and Investment Choices: An Experimental Approach to Decision Making in Ecosystems," Organization Science, 2019
  • With S. Sah, "Conflict of Interest Disclosure with High-Quality Advice: The Disclosure Penalty and the Altruistic Signal," Psychology Public Policy, and Law, 2019 
  • With J. Tong and A. Ivantsova, "Good Choice, Bad Judgment: How Choice Under Uncertainty Generates Overoptimism," Psychological Science, 2018
  • With J. Tong and R. Larrick, "A Behavioral Remedy for the Censorship Bias," Production and Operations Management, 2018
  • With J. Tong, "A Behavioral Model of Forecasting: Naive Statistics on Mental Samples," Management Science, 2017
  • With R. Larrick, "Expertise in decision making," In G. Wu (Ed.), Blackwell Handbook of Judgment and Decision Making, 2016
  • With A. Kleinbaum, "Popularity, Similarity, and the Network Extraversion Bias," Psychological Science, 26(5), April 2015
  • With J. Tong and R. Larrick, "Biased Judgment in Censored Environments," Management Science, 59(3), 2013
  • With L. Tost and A. Grant, "Mixed Reasons, Missed Givings: The Costs of Blending Egoistic and Altruistic Reasons in Donation Requests," Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48, 2012