News

Crude Calculations

Marketing professor Kusum Ailawadi studied how gasoline prices impact consumers’ grocery shopping behavior.

Jun 06, 2011

What if You Could Build a House for $300?

Professor Vijay Govindarajan posed this question in his blog on the Harvard Business Review website last August and the response was overwhelming.

Apr 29, 2011

Avoiding Sales Tax—Artful Dodge or Shrinking Loophole?

The lengths online retailers will go to avoid collecting sales taxes is consistent with new research by Leslie Robinson that shows companies can and do avoid taxes not based on income.

Apr 26, 2011

Health Care Data Leaks

M. Eric Johnson, the Benjamin Ames Kimball Professor of the Science of Administration and director of Tuck’s Center for Digital Strategies, says bad software is to blame for information breaches.

Mar 31, 2011

Innovation Ecosystems: Is there a Cost to Collaboration?

More and more companies are using innovation ecosystems to bring better products to market. But Ron Adner, Associate Professor of Business Administration, says all of this collaboration comes at a cost.

Mar 23, 2011

Handicapping the FedEx Cup

The PGA Tour's FedEx Cup has been criticized for its overly complicated points system. But new research by professor Rendleman suggests organizers have it right.

Mar 04, 2011

No Silver Bullet

Mortgage renegotiation has done little to stem the tide of preventable home foreclosures in the United States.

Jan 24, 2011

What Makes Exporters Tick

Andrew Bernard makes the case that big, productive exporters—not entrepreneurial newcomers—hold the key to U.S. export growth.

Jan 04, 2011

A Win-Win That Isn’t

Richard Sansing does the math and shows that tax deductions for R&D may only break even for U.S. taxpayers.

Jan 03, 2011

Picture This

The way consumers remember negative events can affect how distant they feel from them and how likely they are to assign blame to those involved.

Dec 22, 2010

Model Behavior

Judith White says identifying with a strong role model leads to more inspired leadership.

Dec 21, 2010

Does Cash Flow Matter?

Professors Jonathan Lewellen and Katharina Lewellen take a more nuanced look at corporate cash flow and investment—and find a strong correlation.

Dec 15, 2010

Measuring Risk

Markets may hate uncertainty, but traditional earnings volatility measurements, which allow investors get a better handle on risk, aren’t helping to clear things up.

Dec 09, 2010

Taking Stock

In July, the federal government pushed through an unprecedented package of reforms to prevent another financial crisis. But will they work?

Nov 29, 2010

Are We Doing Bankruptcy Wrong? Lessons from Sweden

Espen Eckbo finds that, contrary to assumptions and biases, putting bankrupt companies on the auction block is more efficient than Chapter 11.

Sep 21, 2010

Social Marketing Kick-Starts Savings

Punam Anand Keller uses social marketing research to devise a better—and less costly—way to persuade people to save for retirement.

Sep 20, 2010

The Uptick Rule and a Long View of Short Selling

Karl Diether has studied the uptick rule and finds that its effects on liquidity and volatility are small and best viewed as distortions caused by the rule itself.

Sep 19, 2010

Strengthening the Weakest Link

Brian Tomlin explores how companies can manage risks lurking in their supply chains and discovers that the nature of the risk matters.

Sep 17, 2010

Don’t Cry for Coca-Cola

Peter Golder’s study of brand persistence shows that a recession may be a top brand’s best friend.

Sep 16, 2010

Rock and a Hard Place at the Cineplex: Timing DVD Releases

Assistant Professor Y. Jackie Luan has developed an econometric model to help film studios find balance—and maximum revenue—as theaters and DVDs fight it out.

Sep 16, 2010

Pay to Play: Tallying the Costs of Active Investing

Investor behavior has long been at odds with investor wisdom. Most investors chase potential profits by actively buying and selling stocks—or by hiring someone else to do it for them—although trading costs and management fees significantly reduce their net returns. New research by Tuck Professor Kenneth R. French quantifies the costs of such active investing and provides strong evidence that a passive approach is better for most investors.

Sep 13, 2010

Upstream, Downstream in an Innovation Ecosystem

Ron Adner raises new issues regarding the design of business models in the collaborative partnerships known as innovation ecosystems.

Sep 10, 2010

Self-Regulation vs. Risky Business

Andrew King worries that industry self-regulation may attract “undue credence,” but his research is discovering factors that can help make it a success.

Sep 09, 2010

Accounting for Change

Leslie Robinson and Phillip Stocken’s creative use of closely-held accounting data shows a long-term trend to more autonomy for U.S. overseas subsidiaries.

Aug 24, 2010

Airline Alliances: Better Ways to Share the Pie

Robert Shumsky finds that sharing agreements among alliance members may limit revenue for the alliance as a whole.

Aug 24, 2010

Connecting the Dots: Tax Law and Accounting Policy

Leslie Robinson’s research reveals surprising results on the repatriation decisions of U.S. multinational corporations.

Aug 24, 2010

“Typical” Consumers Need Not Apply

Praveen Kopalle’s research demonstrates that so-called “emergent consumers” can help create more appealing products.

Aug 24, 2010

The Promise and Peril of Industry Self-Regulation?

To function best, a "free market" requires the support of institutions. Without laws that provide for the enforcement of contracts, people are less likely to engage in trade, and beneficial exchanges go unrealized. Without a means to protect intellectual property, inventors fear to reveal their ideas and technological progress is suppressed.

Aug 24, 2010

Security Issue Timing: Betting on a Sure Thing

Katharina Lewellen and her colleagues find that managers are effective at identifying mispricing of their own securities and are willing to exploit it by selling or buying securities using the corporate account.

Aug 24, 2010

Data Hemorrhages: Digital Medical Records Run Wild

Electronic medical records are in the news, with President Obama calling for the medical records of every American to be digitized by 2014, and the stimulus package providing $19 billion to make it happen.

Aug 24, 2010

Tweaking CAPM

Forty years ago, economist William Sharpe rattled Wall Street when he balanced risks and rewards mathematically. At first seen as heretical and later as “commanding,” his capital asset pricing model (CAPM) earned him the Nobel prize in 1990. Succeeding generations of distinguished scholars have continued to tweak the model and debate it, among them Tuck Professor Jonathan Lewellen.

Aug 24, 2010

Do You Know Where Your Competition Is?

Richard D’Aveni and former Tuck professor Koen Pauwels have come up with a new method to uncover the nature and structural changes of competition in fast-changing markets.

Aug 19, 2010

Think Outside of the Box (Store): Defending Against Walmart

Kusum Ailawadi has run the numbers—lots of numbers—and discovered that the best defense is fine-tuned for individual stores and categories.

Aug 19, 2010

Private-Label Products in the Manufacturer-Retailer Power Balance

The economy is in a major downturn, and supermarket prices for products ranging from milk and eggs to shampoo and laundry detergent are up 20 to 70 percent compared to a year ago. Just the kind of environment in which consumers tend to shift from national brands to significantly lower priced private labels, and at a time when private labels are already seeing a worldwide surge in availability and market share.

Aug 19, 2010

Research and the MBA

In 2008, Peter Golder, then at NYU, and his coauthor, Debanjan Mitra, published, "Does Academic Research Help or Hurt MBA Programs?" in the Journal of Marketing. Their results showed that research did in fact benefit MBA programs.

Jun 10, 2010