Research Highlights

Winter 2018

Vijay Govindarajan, Coxe Distinguished Professor of Management

Vijay Govindarajan, Coxe Distinguished Professor of Management

Awards
Vijay Govindarajan, the Coxe Distinguished Professor of Management

  • Best Paper Award for “Reverse Innovation, Emerging Markets, and Global Strategy,” Strategic Management Society, October 2017
  • Ranked by Thinkers50 (#21) as one of the world’s most influential management thinkers, November 2017
Richard D'Aveni, the Bakala Professor of Strategy

Richard D'Aveni, the Bakala Professor of Strategy

Awards
Richard D'Aveni, the Bakala Professor of Strategy

  • Strategy Award, Thinkers50, November 2017
  • Ranked by Thinkers50 (#9) as one of the world’s most influential management thinkers, November 2017
  • Recognized by Web of Science as ranking among the top one percent of works cited in 2017 for “The Age of Temporary Advantage,” Strategic Management Journal, 2010 
Kusum Ailawadi, the Charles Jordan 1911, TU’12 Professor of Marketing

Kusum Ailawadi, the Charles Jordan 1911, TU’12 Professor of Marketing

The Club Store Effect: Impact of Shopping in Warehouse Club Stores on Consumers’ Packaged Food Purchases
Journal of Market Research, Forthcoming
Kusum Ailawadi, the Charles Jordan 1911, TU’12 Professor of Marketing, studies the impact of shopping at warehouse club stores on households’ packaged food-for-home purchases. Ailawadi finds a substantial increase in the total quantity (servings per capita) of purchases attributable to shopping at this format and, because there is no effect on quality of purchases, this translates into a substantial increase in calories, sugar, and saturated fat per capita. The results have important implications for how marketers can create win–win opportunities for themselves and for consumers.

Constance Helfat, the J. Brian Quinn Professor in Technology and Strategy

Constance Helfat, the J. Brian Quinn Professor in Technology and Strategy

Recent Presentations
Constance Helfat, the J. Brian Quinn Professor in Technology and Strategy

  • “20 Years of Dynamic Capabilities,” Academy of Management Annual Meeting, August 2017
  • “Product Sequencing, Vertical Integration, and Integrative Capabilities in Platform Ecosystems,” Academy of Management Annual Meeting, August 2017
  • “Integrating Generations of Strategic Management Research,” Strategic Management Society Annual Meeting, October 2017
  • “Reconsidering Resource Allocation,” Strategic Management Society Annual Meeting, October 2017
Praveen Kopalle, Associate Dean for the MBA Program; Signal Companies’ Professor of Management

Praveen Kopalle, Associate Dean for the MBA Program; Signal Companies’ Professor of Management

Sharing Economy: Review of Current Research and Future Directions
Consumer Needs and Solutions, Forthcoming
The sharing economy, in which ordinary consumers also act as sellers, is attracting much interest from scholars and practitioners. The rapid growth of this sector of the economy and the emergence of several large brands like Uber and Airbnb raise several interesting questions that need to be researched. Praveen Kopalle, associate dean for the MBA program and Signal Companies’ Professor of Management, reviews and summarizes the extant research on this sector and suggests additional areas for future research, such as pricing.

Presentation

  • “Can’t Take the Heat? Field Experiment in Residential Energy Conservation,” Invitational Inaugural Marketing Camp, Indian School of Business, 2017
Gordon Phillips, the C.V. Starr Foundation Professor; Faculty Director, Center for Private Equity and Entrepreneurship

Gordon Phillips, the C.V. Starr Foundation Professor; Faculty Director, Center for Private Equity and Entrepreneurship

The Impact of Bank Credit on Labor Reallocation and Aggregate Industry Productivity
Journal of Finance, Forthcoming
Gordon Phillips, the C.V. Starr Foundation Professor and faculty director of the Center for Private Equity and Entrepreneurship, provides evidence that the deregulation of U.S. state banking markets leads to a significant increase in the relative employment and capital growth of local firms with higher productivity and that this effect is concentrated among young firms. His analysis suggests that this effect is driven by a shift in the composition of local bank credit supply towards more productive firms. 

Text–Based Industry Momentum
Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis,Forthcoming
Tests the hypothesis that low visibility shocks to text–based network industry peers can explain industry momentum. Phillips finds that shocks to less visible peers generate economically large momentum profits, and are stronger than own–firm momentum variables. More visible traditional SIC–based peers generate only small, short–lived momentum profits. The findings are consistent with momentum profits arising partially from inattention to economic links of less visible industry peers.

Presentations

  • “Venture Capital Investments and Merger and Acquisition Activity around the World,” Finance Seminar Speaker, Michigan State University, September 2017
  • “The Impact of Consumer Credit Access on Employment, Earnings and Entrepreneurship,” Finance Seminar Speaker, Yale School of Management, October 2017
  • “The Impact of Consumer Credit Access on Employment, Earnings and Entrepreneurship,” Guest Speaker, London Business School, 2017
  • “How Credit Constraints Impact Job Finding Rates, Sorting & Aggregate Output,” Guest Speaker, MIT Sloan School of Management, 2017
  • “How Credit Constraints Impact Job Finding Rates, Sorting & Aggregate Output,” Speaker, National Bureau of Economic Research, 2017
  • “Venture Capital Investments and Merger and Acquisition Activity around the World,” Guest Speaker, Indiana University, 2017
  • “Venture Capital Investments and Merger and Acquisition Activity around the World,” Finance Seminar Speaker, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, 2017
Teresa Fort, Associate Professor of Business Administration

Teresa Fort, Associate Professor of Business Administration

The Margins of Global Sourcing: Theory and Evidence from US Firms
American Economic Review, September 2017
Teresa Fort, associate professor of business administration, develops a quantifiable multi-country sourcing model in which firms self-select into importing based on their productivity and country-specific variables. She shows that, under an empirically relevant condition, selection into importing exhibits complementarities across source markets. Fort's model highlights the importance of interdependencies in firms’ sourcing decisions across markets, which generate heterogeneous domestic sourcing responses to trade shocks.

Presentations

  • “Empirical Evidence on Offshoring, Reorganization, and Innovation,” Comparative Analysis of Enterprise Data Conference Keynote Address, September 2017
Eesha Sharma, Associate Professor of Business Administration; Paul E. Raether T’73 Faculty Fellow

Eesha Sharma, Associate Professor of Business Administration; Paul E. Raether T’73 Faculty Fellow

“Too Constrained to Converse: Financial Constraints Reduce Word-of-Mouth”
Journal of Consumer Research, Forthcoming
Existing research demonstrates that financial constraints are widespread and influence consumer attention, preference, choice, and consumption. Despite the growing knowledge of how financial constraints affect the consumer decision making process, less is known about its impact on post-purchase behavior. Eesha Sharma, associate professor of business administration and Paul E. Raether T’73 Faculty Fellow, examines whether financial constraints impact an important post-purchase behavior—word-of-mouth—and in what direction. 

Presentation

  • “Too Constrained to Converse: Financial Constraints Reduce Word-of-Mouth,” Association for Consumer Research Conference, October 2017