Research Highlights

Fall 2017

Vijay Govindarajan, Coxe Distinguished Professor of Management

Vijay Govindarajan, Coxe Distinguished Professor of Management

Can Reverse Innovation Catalyze Better Value Health Care?
The Lancet,October 2017

The remarkable progress emerging economies have made over the past few decades has attracted the attention of leaders and policymakers from developed countries across various industries. Vijay Govindarajan, Coxe Distinguished Professor of Management, illustrates the lessons western health systems could learn from low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) that have successfully been doing more for less. Healthcare innovations from LMICs can inspire health providers faced with the universal challenge of delivering high quality outcomes with increasingly scarce resources.


B. Espen Eckbo, Tuck Centennial Professor of Finance

B. Espen Eckbo, Tuck Centennial Professor of Finance; Founding Director, Lindenauer Center for 
​Corporate Governance

Recent Presentations
B. Espen Eckbo, Tuck Centennial Professor of Finance; Founding Director, Lindenauer Center for Corporate Governance

  • “Is the Conditional Leverage-Profitability Correlation Positive?” UBC Summer Finance Conference, July 2017
  • “Leverage Dynamics of High-Frequency Debt Issuers,” Norwegian Research Council Conference on Corporate Finance and Compensation Policy Keynote Speech, August 2017
  • “How Costly is Forced Gender-Balancing of Corporate Boards?” European Finance Association, August 2017

Constance Helfat, J. Brian Quinn Professor in Technology and Strategy

Constance Helfat, J. Brian Quinn Professor in Technology and Strategy

Recent Presentations
Constance Helfat, J. Brian Quinn Professor in Technology and Strategy

  • “20 Years of Dynamic Capabilities,” Academy of Management Annual Meeting, August 2017
  • “Product Sequencing, Vertical Integration, and Integrative Capabilities in Platform Ecosystems,” Academy of Management Annual Meeting, August 2017
  • “Human Capital and Organizational Capabilities,” Academy of Management Annual Meeting, August 2017

Richard Sansing, Associate Dean for Faculty; Noble Foundation Professor of Accounting

Richard Sansing, Associate Dean for Faculty; Noble Foundation Professor of Accounting

Development Cost Capitalization During R&D Races
Contemporary Accounting Research,Fall 2017 

Richard Sansing, associate dean for faculty and Noble Foundation Professor of Accounting, investigates the economic effects of capitalizing development costs during a race between two firms to discover and develop a new technology. Capitalization of development costs provides a credible signal regarding progress in the race, allowing the rival to make a more informed decision regarding whether to proceed with development. He studies the effects of this signal on the firms’ investment decisions and social welfare and shows that if both firms capitalize instead of expense development costs, aggregate investment in research weakly increases but aggregate investment in development weakly decreases.


Emily Blanchard, Associate Professor of Business Administration

Emily Blanchard, Associate Professor of Business Administration

Private Labels and Exports: Trading Variety for Volume
Review of World Economics, August 2017

Emily Blanchard, associate professor of business administration, and coauthors Tatyana Chesnokova and Gerald Willmann explore the role of private label trade intermediation in shaping the range and diversity of exports and imports. Whereas direct sales maintain a firm’s unique product characteristics, or “brand equity,” trade through an intermediary often takes the form of “private label” sales, under which multiple firms’ output is pooled and re-sold under a new private label brand created by the intermediary. The authors illustrate that these private label arrangements result in greater total export and import volumes and lower average prices for consumers, but fewer independent varieties available to consumers in equilibrium. 

Presentations

  • “New Roles and Rules for Trade Agreements in the GVC Era,” UNIDO & IFW Kiel Institute’s “Developing Inclusive and Sustainable Global Value Chains in the Digital Age” Conference, September 2017

Ellie Kyung, Associate Professor of Business Administration

Ellie Kyung, Associate Professor of Business Administration

Recent Presentations
Ellie Kyung, Associate Professor of Business Administration

  • “How Slider Scales Systematically Bias Willingness-To-Pay: Implicit Recalibration of Monetary Magnitudes,” University of South Carolina’s “The Effect of Numerical Markers on Consumer Judgment and Decision Making” Conference, April 2017
  • “How Slider Scales Systematically Bias Willingness-To-Pay: Implicit Recalibration of Monetary Magnitudes,” University of Illinois’ “New Directions in Pricing Management Research and Practice” Conference, May 2017
  • “How Slider Scales Systematically Bias Willingness-To-Pay: Implicit Recalibration of Monetary Magnitudes,” Northeast Marketing Consortium, October 2017

Daniel Feiler, Assistant Professor of Business Administratio

Daniel Feiler, Assistant Professor of Business Administration

Good Choice, Bad Judgment: How Choice under Uncertainty Generates Overoptimism” 
Psychological Science, Forthcoming

Overestimating an alternative makes one more likely to choose it. Daniel Feiler, assistant professor of business administration, examines this fundamental feature of choice under uncertainty and finds that if people are naive to this structural feature, they will tend to have erroneously inflated expectations for the alternatives they choose. In contrast to theories of motivated reasoning, this theory suggests that individuals will overestimate chosen alternatives even before the choice. The results illustrate how readily overoptimism emerges due to statistical naivete, even in the absence of a desire to justify one’s decision post-choice.