News

Doctor Strange Is Marvel’s Latest Box Office Hit

As a guest on Marketplace, Vijay Govindarajan comments on Disney’s acquisition of Marvel in light of the latest film, “Doctor Strange,” which dominated the weekend box office. “No, I was not familiar with Doctor Strange. This is the beauty of it,” said Govindarajan admiring a giant deal that proved many skeptics wrong. “When Disney acquired Marvel for four billion dollars people thought that was a bad move. People thought there’s nothing left in Marvel—there’s no juice in Marvel.”

Nov 07, 2016

Slaughter & Rees Report: The Day of Reckoning Is Upon Us—Three Reasons to Channel Tigger,...

Surely after all of tomorrow’s votes are counted, America can find similar common spirit in the pursuit of a better economic tomorrow.

Nov 07, 2016

International Trade Slows Despite Globalization Fears

As a guest on WNYC’s “The Takeaway,” Dean Matthew Slaughter discusses the topic of international trade and its effect on voters in the upcoming presidential election. “Voters care more about how they’re doing—how’s their job, how’s their pocketbook looking, and a sense of opportunity,” says Slaughter. “And I think the environment that we find ourselves in now is one where, both on the left and right in America and in a lot of other countries, people are very focused on the reality which is that greater trade and other forms of globalization don’t directly benefit every single worker, company and community. I think it’s those distributional challenges—especially in the United States—that are really coming to the fore.”

Nov 01, 2016

Revers Gift Propels New Energy Center at Tuck

Tuck is pleased to announce the launch of the new Revers Center for Energy, established to inspire and shape tomorrow’s leaders in energy while engaging in today’s energy economy, and made possible through a generous gift from Daniel Revers T’89, managing partner and co-founder of ArcLight Capital Partners and a member of Tuck’s board of overseers.

Nov 01, 2016

Ikea Strategy Ditches the Dream Home for the Daily Grind

Quotes Kevin Lane Keller about Ikea's new "We Help You Make It" advertising campaign and inclusive message, “No matter who you are, what you do, or how much you make, you can still make the dream yours.” Keller opines, “This is the reality. They're not trying to romanticize any of this stuff. They're sort of taking this more democratic view, this more down-to-earth view, talking about where people are."

Oct 30, 2016

Seventh Generation Says Corporate Buyout is a Chance to Take its Mission Global

As a guest on "VPR News," Paul Argenti comments about Unilever’s recent acquisition of the natural homecare company Seventh Generation. Argenti states that incorporating social and environmental goals into the company’s values is attractive to both customers and employees—especially millennials. “Your reputation is the most important asset that you have," says Argenti. "If you're avoiding getting into problems in the future by solving problems today, you're going to be a company that is stronger in the future."

Oct 26, 2016

Tata’s Shock Coup Follows Simmering Rift at India’s Biggest Firm

Quotes Vijay Govindarajan in an article about the controversial dismissal of Cyrus Mistry as chairman of Tata Sons Limited, the holding company of India’s largest conglomerate Tata Group. “The biggest challenge for an organization is planning for succession, especially following the tenure of a very successful CEO,” says Govindarajan. “The current leadership crisis is an unwanted distraction.”

Oct 26, 2016

Donald Trump’s Brand Takes a Hit From Sexual Assault Allegations and Lewd Video

Quotes Kevin Lane Keller about how the ugliest presidential race in modern history has tarnished the Trump name to such degree that it may jeopardize the future of his business enterprises. Keller says that some would-be customers may avoid patronizing Trump's business because of concerns about what other people may think. “All this negative press, the negative reactions from people, it’s got to hurt his brand,” says Keller. “They don’t want to have to apologize for staying at a Trump hotel or buying a Trump brand. And when you get into luxury, image matters a lot.”

Oct 22, 2016

Meet Dartmouth Tuck’s MBA Class of 2018

Quotes Patricia Harrison, senior associate director of admissions, in a feature article highlighting a dozen T’18 students. “While the students in Tuck’s class of 2018 are smart, accomplished and diverse, they’re so much more than what the stats reveal,” says Harrison. “In the short time that they’ve been on campus, we have noticed their humility and empathy in particular. They are open to ideas and experiences different than their own and seem acutely aware of how their actions impact others.” The article profiles the following students: Richard Asala, Michael Blanc, H. Holland Davis, Ramon Fuentebella, Jodine Gordon, Vedrana Greatorex, Daniel Marquez, Muyambi Muyambi, Rachel Phillips, Chethan Rao, Erica Toews, and Stephiney Xie.

Oct 21, 2016

Right Tech, Wrong Time

An opinion piece co-authored by Ron Adner examines the shifts in technology that disrupt businesses and industries and the importance of timing these transitions. “Few modern firms are untouched by the urgency of innovation,” says Adner. “But when it comes to strategizing for a revolution, the question of ‘whether’ often drowns out the question of ‘when.’”

Oct 20, 2016

Making Billions With One Belief: The Markets Can’t Be Beat

Cites research conducted by Kenneth French and his colleague Eugene Fama that shows stocks with smaller market capitalizations—including those trading at low prices relative to their asset values and those with above-average profitability—outperform in the long run.

Oct 20, 2016

Slaughter & Rees Report: Your Huddled Masses Yearning to Win Nobel Prizes

This year’s six U.S.-immigrant Nobel laureates underscore a vital message about innovation that policy makers today seem to either ignore or have forgotten, say Slaughter & Rees.

Oct 17, 2016

Bringing Light to the Grey Gconomy

Cites research conducted by Rafael La Porta in an article about the impact that an informal economy versus a formal economy can have on a country due to tax losses. “In poor countries the average formal firm employs 126 people, compared with just four for informal ones, according to La Porta,” writes The Economist.

Oct 15, 2016

Pro: Samsung Can Survive Phone Crisis

As a guest on CNBC's “Power Lunch,” Paul Argenti discusses Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 crisis and where the company stands in terms of damage control. “I’m not worried about the company surviving, but the product is another story,” says Argenti.

Oct 11, 2016

Two Ways to Break into India’s Consumer Market

An opinion piece co-authored by Vijay Govindarajan about how multinational companies can enter the market in India by leveraging the county’s supply chain and taking advantage of its growing e-commerce. “Nimble global consumer companies looking for growth can accelerate their entry into India while mitigating their risks if they use one or both strategies,” writes Govindarajan.

Oct 10, 2016

Surveillance: Gross Says Job Report Won’t Bar Fed Rate Increase

As a guest on "Bloomberg Surveillance," Peter Fisher talks about the U.S. economy. "We wish we had more of an acceleration in this recovery. We wish we were doing better in some terms, but we're doing pretty well especially compared with the rest of the world—just looking at the level of our unemployment, the level of our GDP. It's disappointing, but it’s also better than the neighborhood, absolutely,” says Fisher. He also comments on the Fed targeting low-level volatility.

Oct 07, 2016

Vogel: Housing Bonds

In his latest VPR interview, John Vogel discusses how the solution to the housing problem in Vermont may be housing bonds—taking advantage of Vermont’s high credit rating and today’s incredibly low interest rates.

Oct 03, 2016

Why the Best Leaders Want Their Superstar Employees to Leave

Sydney Finkelstein explains how an organization can become more resilient, sustainable and successful over the long term by letting top performers leave. “To win big, we can no longer afford to keep our best talent to ourselves,” says Finkelstein. “We have to be willing to lose it. Our talent will be better off, and so will we.”

Oct 02, 2016